China Can Beat the U.S. Air Force in a War

Beijingwalker

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China Can Beat the U.S. Air Force in a War

China’s war planners have not only beefed up their numbers of aircraft but they have also expanded their technological prowess. China has constructed a bevy of what they are calling Fifth-Generation warplanes to rival America’s F-22 Raptor and F-35. Many technology analysts argue that China’s Fifth-Generation warplanes aren’t as good or stealthy as America’s. But that’s beside the point.

by Brandon J. Weichert
April 15, 2024

For 20 years, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) has striven to reach parity with the United States Air Force. A recent Pentagon report highlights the various ways that China’s air force has at the very least, become a true near-peer competitor to the USAF.

In many respects, the Chinese air force might be able to overwhelm the Americans in a fight over Taiwan by sheer numbers of warplanes.

Chinese generals have planned for a 96-hour air war for dominance in the skies above Taiwan. They plan for surgical strikes against key infrastructure nodes. China’s forces have planned for a decapitation strike against the Taiwanese government, too. Much of these moves would be a prelude to an invasion of Taiwan.

China needs an air force that is both large enough to swamp whatever territorial defenses Taiwan has, and to defend its territory and invasion force from the likely military responses of the United States and its regional allies.

China’s war planners have not only beefed up their numbers of aircraft but they have also expanded their technological prowess. China has constructed a bevy of what they are calling Fifth-Generation warplanes to rival America’s F-22 Raptor and F-35. Many technology analysts argue that China’s Fifth-Generation warplanes aren’t as good or stealthy as America’s.

But that’s beside the point. China doesn’t need to be pitch-perfect with anything they’re building. They just need to be good enough—which they are.

The old Maoism doctrine of “quantity having a quality of its own” combines nicely here with the old axiom that, “geography is destiny.” China’s targets, whether it be northern India, the South or East China Seas, or Taiwan are all near China's shores.

These territories are distant from America.

China's Home-Field Advantage

Thus, the U.S. military must deploy its forces across vast distances and rely upon regional partners for basing and refueling rights to get its military nearby to China’s area of conflict. Beijing enjoys the equivalent of home-field advantages over the Americans and massive industrial capabilities to churn out their warplanes like butter.

The fact that China’s planes aren’t as sophisticated as America’s is also, unfortunately, an advantage for China. Their planes can be replaced at a much more reliable, faster, and easier rate than America can deploy, repair, and replace its warplanes.

Take the F-22 Raptor, for example. In every wargame scenario the Pentagon runs, the introduction of even a small number of Raptors can tip a potential battle with Chinese forces in America’s favor.

Yet, there are a limited number of those warplanes. And while these planes can do more than previous generations of warplanes, if faced with significantly higher numbers of Chinese fighters, they will eventually be taken down. What's more, China's inventory of stealth warplanes is set to surpass that of America's.

As for the F-35, the U.S. military’s preferred replacement for the aging fourth-generation warplane fleet, there are many problems with this vehicle.

First, China stole the detailed schematics of this warplane as early as 2005, during a cyber operation known as Titan Rain. They have had ample time to copy the plane as well as to build countermeasures against it.

Second, the F-35 is not nearly as good of an air-to-air fighter as the F-22.

Yet, former President Barack Obama discontinued the production line of the F-22 in 2009 to save costs. The number of F-22s the U.S. air fleet has at its disposal is the highest number it will have until the vaunted sixth-generation warplane is ready in a decade or so.

Third, the F-35 is far more expensive plane than most Chinese planes to produce and maintain. If airframes are lost at a faster clip than what America’s limited industrial capacity can replace in wartime, then those assets are gone, and strategic vulnerabilities are created in the American defense.

There’s the added problem that has plagued America in the post-World War II strategic environment. Whereas America, as a self-styled global power—a superpower, no less—has expansive interests in basically every region in the world, China’s core strategic interests remain close to Chinese territory. Of course, that means that possible war with the West would likely be fought closer to Chinese homes.

But that means that China can tailor their regional forces to pack a heavier punch against the distracted, strained, and stretched international U.S. forces.

Going to War with Our Suppliers?

Meanwhile, imbalances and inefficiencies plague America’s military supply chain. In fact, the president of leading American defense contractor Raytheon chided U.S. policymakers over the summer for risking war with China.

That’s because so much of America’s defense supply chain runs through China. Will Beijing let the U.S. military have open access to wartime supplies in the event of a conflict between the United States and China? Don’t be ridiculous. China has America by the short hair.

China, on the other hand, does not have these problems. Not only has China worked assiduously to proof its society and economy against Western economic sanctions, but it has furthered ties with nearby powers—notably Russia—to ensure that its industrial base will remain untouched by any conflict with the West.

There remain vulnerabilities for China. But in the specific case of China’s massive air fleet and the proximity of their targets to Chinese forces, China could defeat the U.S. alliance in an air war over Taiwan. With America's possible loss of air dominance over Taiwan, China's invasion would have a free hand to do whatever it wanted to against Taiwan's defenders--and Taiwan would be isolated away from its Western allies for the duration of the invasion – unless America sought to significantly escalate against China which is unlikely.
 

GoMig-21

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Interesting article and touches on a signific potential development and subject that doesn't really get discussed much in detail, despite its popularity amongst many of us military & political enthusiasts, especially when it involves some of our favorite specific subject matter - fighter gets and war! lol

Not too often you get an article that is truthful in the sense that one can't just say it's biased so much, even though the premise somewhat is. It's still quite objective enough and brings a lot of facts to support its point. These are the types of articles and subject I most always enjoy addressing.

First, China stole the detailed schematics of this warplane as early as 2005, during a cyber operation known as Titan Rain. They have had ample time to copy the plane as well as to build countermeasures against it.

I don't know about that LOL! The "detailed schematics" of the F-35?! Come on hahaha. @Hamartia Antidote or @Nilgiri or @gambit or @F-22Raptor what do you fellas think of this all too well-known, long-standing baseless and rather unlikely travesty happening? 😂

Travesty in both senses of the word, as in shamefully admitting to thievery and impropriety by China as well as the inevitable insinuation that perhaps they wouldn't have been capable of building their own stealthy aircraft (at least not in the caliber of US ones) had it not been for "stealing" & "thieving" US' detailed plans which at the same time also suggest the prowess and high level of technological sophistication of the United States over China. It also casts a shadow of potential security 'incompetence' on the US' part not being able to safely guard & protect such top secret and highly valuable military information. All that is aside from the story being bogus to me in the first place anyway lol.

That’s because so much of America’s defense supply chain runs through China. Will Beijing let the U.S. military have open access to wartime supplies in the event of a conflict between the United States and China? Don’t be ridiculous. China has America by the short hair.

And vice versa in manner of speaking. How valuable is the South China Sea to China's own economy? Short hair is quite appropriate in this case.

There remain vulnerabilities for China.

I would think so, too.

But in the specific case of China’s massive air fleet and the proximity of their targets to Chinese forces, China could defeat the U.S. alliance in an air war over Taiwan. With America's possible loss of air dominance over Taiwan, China's invasion would have a free hand to do whatever it wanted to against Taiwan's defenders--and Taiwan would be isolated away from its Western allies for the duration of the invasion – unless America sought to significantly escalate against China which is unlikely.

So what is China waiting for? The US has done just about everything for Taiwan -- short of publicly declaring it US territory which it'll obviously never do -- to signal China that it is an independent nation, let alone a democratic one and to forget about communist expansion which really was the bottom line to the origins of this tension. And with all that tension this situation has created for China, I would think it's about as exacerbated as it could get short of something that makes war between the two superpowers officially declare war which we know will never happen. But this seems to gnaw at China's craw, so to speak, and the level of importance Taiwan is to China I would think would make it push a lot harder than just the occasional dangerous and inconsiderate aerial interception lol and all the tough talk. Let's at least have a good old-fashioned aerial warfare.

How awesome would that be? A revisiting of WWII's spectacular naval but especially air battles over the South China Seas with today's modern-day combat aircraft in China's latest state of the art, modern naval carriers/aircraft and PLAAF aircraft against the United States' historically renowned US Navy/Marines and USAF. Wow what a showdown that would be.
 

Hamartia Antidote

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First, China stole the detailed schematics of this warplane as early as 2005, during a cyber operation known as Titan Rain. They have had ample time to copy the plane as well as to build countermeasures against it.

Oh I see..the Chinese Government isn't involved with hacking/theft...except for this single time.

All those cries of "this hacking talk is just a Western smear campaign against China..."

smear2.png
 
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Hendarto

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Not only that US bases in Korea, Japan, and Guam are vulnerable to attack as they were bunched in a small number of bases and all of them had no hardened shelter a big vulnerability. While Chinese squadrons are spread over a large number of bases and most of them are hardened

US bases woefully exposed to Chinese missile attacks​

US lawmakers criticize Pentagon’s sluggish approach to Indo-Pacific base defense upgrades amid China’s growing strike capabilities
By GABRIEL HONRADA
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US lawmakers are demanding urgent upgrades to US military bases in the Indo-Pacific, citing the severe threat posed by China’s improving strike capabilities while criticizing the US Department of Defense’s (DOD) slow adoption of critical defenses.

This month, Representative John Moolenaar and Senator Marco Rubio addressed a critical letter to US Secretary of the Air Force Frank Kendall and US Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro, urging immediate enhancements to the resilience of US military facilities in Asia.

They highlighted the grave threat posed by China’s missiles, which can now target all US bases in the region, including those in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

The lawmakers criticized the DOD’s slow adoption of passive defenses like hardened aircraft shelters, which are crucial to withstand and quickly recover from potential Chinese missile attacks.

The letter’s signatories requested a shift from the restrictive “Munitions and Explosives of Concern” procedures to the more efficient “Recognize, Retreat, Report” approach while demanding answers on steps to be taken to enhance base defenses.

They warned that failure to act could severely impair the US military’s operational capabilities in a conflict including in the case of a Chinese invasion of Taiwan.

The New York Times reported in April 2024 that the Biden administration is indeed urgently transforming US defense infrastructure in the Indo-Pacific to counter the escalating threat of a Taiwan war.

Since assuming office, President Joe Biden has expanded military access to bases in allied nations across the Indo-Pacific and deployed advanced weapon systems, including Tomahawk missiles in Japan and mobile missile launchers in the Philippines.

China has constructed over 400 such shelters in the past decade, while the US has added only 22, according to reports. The letter also called out a cumbersome DOD regulation on handling World War II-era munitions, which delays essential construction projects and inflates costs.

This strategic shift aims to distribute US forces in smaller, more mobile units across the region rather than concentrating them at large bases, thereby making them less vulnerable to Chinese missile strikes.

However, a June 2023 report by the US Congressional Research Service (CRS) highlights significant concerns regarding the survivability of US defense infrastructure in the Indo-Pacific against a Chinese attack.

The report underscores that the US maintains at least 66 significant regional defense sites, which are crucial for basing military personnel, conducting maintenance and supporting operations. It notes the current basing posture, largely reflective of Cold War-era decisions, is increasingly vulnerable to China’s increasingly advanced missile capabilities.

Key installations, especially those west of the International Date Line including in Japan, South Korea and Guam, are well within striking range of Chinese missiles.
 
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Hendarto

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Meanwhile, the navy has a problem with its inefficient shipyard and outdated design practice of still using Autocad a 2D-drawing CAD while China uses 3 D system

US Navy too slow, too outdated to match China’s surging fleet​

Less than 40% of US Navy ships repaired on time while outdated design practices extend China’s already sizable shipbuilding lead

Plagued by delays in ship repairs and outdated design practices, the US Navy faces mounting challenges in maintaining readiness and keeping pace with China’s rapid shipbuilding advancements.

This month, USNI News reported that the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) revealed that fewer than 40% of US Navy ships had completed repairs on time, despite the availability of shipyard space.

The GAO ranked shipyard conditions second only to F-35 Lightning II air fighter sustainment costs as the most problematic readiness issue facing the US armed services.

The US Navy’s Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Program (SIOP), which aims to enhance the quality of dry docks, facilities and equipment, lacks a comprehensive cost and schedule estimate, the USNI report said.

The US Navy works with private and public yards to cut maintenance delays before returning to service through better planning, identifying long-lead items needed and greater workforce size and skills. But it is still facing a crisis in repairing ships on time and on budget.


Moreover, Naval Technology reported this month that the US Navy’s ship design process is deemed too slow and less predictable due to lengthy design practices. Naval Technology says that the US Navy’s industrial base is struggling to deliver the surface fleet at a pace that meets its requirements amid an uncertain geopolitical environment.

Commercial ship buyers and builders prioritize shorter, predictable design and construction periods, resulting in timely ships that meet current user needs. The US Navy’s ship design practices contribute to a slower pace and less predictable cost, schedule and performance outcomes, the Naval Technology report said.

In addition to bureaucratic delays and outdated design processes, the US Navy is lagging in modern design techniques too. Defense One reported that the GAO mentioned that the US Navy is slow to adopt modern ship-designing tools. The GAO found that Navy shipbuilders’ use of these tools remains more limited than with commercial builders.

Defense One mentions that the GAO highlights instances where shipbuilders and maintainers, such as Chevron and Damen, use digital twinning in the commercial world. Defense One also says shipbuilders are eager to employ new technologies like augmented reality and high-fidelity 3-D design rendering.

However, the US Navy faces obstacles in obtaining vendor-furnished information (VFI) data, which is necessary for digital modeling. The continued use of 2D design information for legacy ship classes and the need for new digital tools are also challenges, the Defense One report said.
 

Nilgiri

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Interesting article and touches on a signific potential development and subject that doesn't really get discussed much in detail, despite its popularity amongst many of us military & political enthusiasts, especially when it involves some of our favorite specific subject matter - fighter gets and war! lol

Not too often you get an article that is truthful in the sense that one can't just say it's biased so much, even though the premise somewhat is. It's still quite objective enough and brings a lot of facts to support its point. These are the types of articles and subject I most always enjoy addressing.



I don't know about that LOL! The "detailed schematics" of the F-35?! Come on hahaha. @Hamartia Antidote or @Nilgiri or @gambit or @F-22Raptor what do you fellas think of this all too well-known, long-standing baseless and rather unlikely travesty happening? 😂

Travesty in both senses of the word, as in shamefully admitting to thievery and impropriety by China as well as the inevitable insinuation that perhaps they wouldn't have been capable of building their own stealthy aircraft (at least not in the caliber of US ones) had it not been for "stealing" & "thieving" US' detailed plans which at the same time also suggest the prowess and high level of technological sophistication of the United States over China. It also casts a shadow of potential security 'incompetence' on the US' part not being able to safely guard & protect such top secret and highly valuable military information. All that is aside from the story being bogus to me in the first place anyway lol.



And vice versa in manner of speaking. How valuable is the South China Sea to China's own economy? Short hair is quite appropriate in this case.



I would think so, too.



So what is China waiting for? The US has done just about everything for Taiwan -- short of publicly declaring it US territory which it'll obviously never do -- to signal China that it is an independent nation, let alone a democratic one and to forget about communist expansion which really was the bottom line to the origins of this tension. And with all that tension this situation has created for China, I would think it's about as exacerbated as it could get short of something that makes war between the two superpowers officially declare war which we know will never happen. But this seems to gnaw at China's craw, so to speak, and the level of importance Taiwan is to China I would think would make it push a lot harder than just the occasional dangerous and inconsiderate aerial interception lol and all the tough talk. Let's at least have a good old-fashioned aerial warfare.

How awesome would that be? A revisiting of WWII's spectacular naval but especially air battles over the South China Seas with today's modern-day combat aircraft in China's latest state of the art, modern naval carriers/aircraft and PLAAF aircraft against the United States' historically renowned US Navy/Marines and USAF. Wow what a showdown that would be.

"walker(s)" see title, and posts without reading the contents, much less think how it contradicts with the narrative/agenda of thousands of previous "china numah wan" spam posts.

The problem with PRC in any breakout domain (AF, Navy, troop conveyance) is the eastern seabord and island geography (that the US is now weaponising and signalling in off the record ways in a deep state to deep state kind of way to achieve the most deterrence possible)..... the media blab is just downstream to this.

The island chain (Japan to Taiwan to PH to Vietnam) at that much proximity ties up huge costs regd PRC force levels required to counter it.

US in comparison has open ocean at its shores while enjoying (sensoring, defence and offence layering, networking and basing and so on) regd. this proximate island chain to PRC.

The path should be fairly clear for the US how to build alliances past the island chain too to augment it, thats how the Quad is shaping up with India and Australia as further collaborative vector spaces.

i.e PRC problem is pretty baked in, much like a salient. Thus the cost involved in this is a huge deterrence by itself.
 

Beijingwalker

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"walker(s)" see title, and posts without reading the contents, much less think how it contradicts with the narrative/agenda of thousands of previous "china numah wan" spam posts.

The problem with PRC in any breakout domain (AF, Navy, troop conveyance) is the eastern seabord and island geography (that the US is now weaponising and signalling in off the record ways in a deep state to deep state kind of way to achieve the most deterrence possible)..... the media blab is just downstream to this.

The island chain (Japan to Taiwan to PH to Vietnam) at that much proximity ties up huge costs regd PRC force levels required to counter it.

US in comparison has open ocean at its shores while enjoying (sensoring, defence and offence layering, networking and basing and so on) regd. this proximate island chain to PRC.

The path should be fairly clear for the US how to build alliances past the island chain too to augment it, thats how the Quad is shaping up with India and Australia as further collaborative vector spaces.

i.e PRC problem is pretty baked in, much like a salient. Thus the cost involved in this is a huge deterrence by itself.
Lol, most US admirals are not as optimistic of you are due to their pathetic shipbuilding industry.
 

gambit

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All I can say is...Bring it on. :cool:

Not a well written article, but one that is seemed to be written on a weekend deadline.
 

GoMig-21

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"walker(s)" see title, and posts without reading the contents, much less think how it contradicts with the narrative/agenda of thousands of previous "china numah wan" spam posts.

Hahaha, one has to hand it to China, though. Not saying you're not doing that, I just think that too many have the tendency to dismiss any potential foe to the mighty United States military and in many cases, rightfully so. A practically unlimited budget with some of the most brilliant minds on earth is an almost unbeatable combination. Why the US is at the forefront of nearly every technological & industrial field. But to the basically knowledgeable individual, it's not too difficult to see that China has its own qualities and advantages and has risen to superpower level and in many ways surpassed Russia not so much a belligerent threat to the United States, but as a competitive.

Unfortunately, some of that threat conception is taken and used to propagate the military industrial concept exactly for that reason. The MIC lobby can't use Russia so much anymore, like it used to extensively during the cold war and for much of the time after. But now China has taken that spot.

You look at how quickly they developed and put the J-20 into operation it's remarkable. Unabashedly reverse-engineering or copying or basically doing whatever it had to in order to get it done, and boy did it ever.

The Su-57 is hardly a threat to the USAF anymore not because of its threat level, but because of that aircraft's developmental stagnation, if it can be called that. It's taken too long to develop the engine (similar to the demise of the MiG-35 and its issues with the AESA radar). Taken too long to get the production line rolling. Too many instances where it's faced criticism and never put up a fight or counter that criticism in any meaningful way.

Then you have the J-20 which exploded out of nowhere and onto the scene and took over 1st place to its Russian counterpart. Almost like the favored track runner in first place at the Olympics coming around the last corner and suddenly some Chinese dude who started in last place catches up to him and passes him to the finish line lol. Because of all that, the Su-57's threat level to the F-22 or even the F-35 is nowhere near that of the J-20, at least on paper anyway.

And if the F-22 or F-35 -- and particularly the NGAD -- need funding from Congress, then the J-20 and the China threat need to be played to get paid.

1715917088543.png


This is the new age we're at now. Long gone are the days of moving from 4th generation fighters to the new concept of stealth and so on. It's all about hyper technology advancement, sensor fusion, counter stealth and unmanned concepts.

And an aerial battle between China and the US even at this stage of the game would be something out of this world. The problem the US would find itself in is that it might not have enough advanced platforms between both, the Raptors and the F-35s to go up against China's J-20s, so it would be forced to bring in its F-15s, F-16s and F/A-18s. At the same time, we really don't know how good the J-20 is since we have no samples to go by like we do with the Raptor and F-35s. Or even the F-15s, 16s & 18s vs J-10Bs & Cs, J-9s & J-11s. It would be a dream to watch, especially with all the visual recording technology available today.
 

Yommie

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When it comes to air dominance, big air superiority fighters matter. That's where J-20 comes into play.
 
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China Can Beat the U.S. Air Force in a War

China’s war planners have not only beefed up their numbers of aircraft but they have also expanded their technological prowess. China has constructed a bevy of what they are calling Fifth-Generation warplanes to rival America’s F-22 Raptor and F-35. Many technology analysts argue that China’s Fifth-Generation warplanes aren’t as good or stealthy as America’s. But that’s beside the point.

by Brandon J. Weichert
April 15, 2024

For 20 years, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) has striven to reach parity with the United States Air Force. A recent Pentagon report highlights the various ways that China’s air force has at the very least, become a true near-peer competitor to the USAF.

In many respects, the Chinese air force might be able to overwhelm the Americans in a fight over Taiwan by sheer numbers of warplanes.

Chinese generals have planned for a 96-hour air war for dominance in the skies above Taiwan. They plan for surgical strikes against key infrastructure nodes. China’s forces have planned for a decapitation strike against the Taiwanese government, too. Much of these moves would be a prelude to an invasion of Taiwan.

China needs an air force that is both large enough to swamp whatever territorial defenses Taiwan has, and to defend its territory and invasion force from the likely military responses of the United States and its regional allies.

China’s war planners have not only beefed up their numbers of aircraft but they have also expanded their technological prowess. China has constructed a bevy of what they are calling Fifth-Generation warplanes to rival America’s F-22 Raptor and F-35. Many technology analysts argue that China’s Fifth-Generation warplanes aren’t as good or stealthy as America’s.

But that’s beside the point. China doesn’t need to be pitch-perfect with anything they’re building. They just need to be good enough—which they are.

The old Maoism doctrine of “quantity having a quality of its own” combines nicely here with the old axiom that, “geography is destiny.” China’s targets, whether it be northern India, the South or East China Seas, or Taiwan are all near China's shores.

These territories are distant from America.

China's Home-Field Advantage

Thus, the U.S. military must deploy its forces across vast distances and rely upon regional partners for basing and refueling rights to get its military nearby to China’s area of conflict. Beijing enjoys the equivalent of home-field advantages over the Americans and massive industrial capabilities to churn out their warplanes like butter.

The fact that China’s planes aren’t as sophisticated as America’s is also, unfortunately, an advantage for China. Their planes can be replaced at a much more reliable, faster, and easier rate than America can deploy, repair, and replace its warplanes.

Take the F-22 Raptor, for example. In every wargame scenario the Pentagon runs, the introduction of even a small number of Raptors can tip a potential battle with Chinese forces in America’s favor.

Yet, there are a limited number of those warplanes. And while these planes can do more than previous generations of warplanes, if faced with significantly higher numbers of Chinese fighters, they will eventually be taken down. What's more, China's inventory of stealth warplanes is set to surpass that of America's.

As for the F-35, the U.S. military’s preferred replacement for the aging fourth-generation warplane fleet, there are many problems with this vehicle.

First, China stole the detailed schematics of this warplane as early as 2005, during a cyber operation known as Titan Rain. They have had ample time to copy the plane as well as to build countermeasures against it.

Second, the F-35 is not nearly as good of an air-to-air fighter as the F-22.

Yet, former President Barack Obama discontinued the production line of the F-22 in 2009 to save costs. The number of F-22s the U.S. air fleet has at its disposal is the highest number it will have until the vaunted sixth-generation warplane is ready in a decade or so.

Third, the F-35 is far more expensive plane than most Chinese planes to produce and maintain. If airframes are lost at a faster clip than what America’s limited industrial capacity can replace in wartime, then those assets are gone, and strategic vulnerabilities are created in the American defense.

There’s the added problem that has plagued America in the post-World War II strategic environment. Whereas America, as a self-styled global power—a superpower, no less—has expansive interests in basically every region in the world, China’s core strategic interests remain close to Chinese territory. Of course, that means that possible war with the West would likely be fought closer to Chinese homes.

But that means that China can tailor their regional forces to pack a heavier punch against the distracted, strained, and stretched international U.S. forces.

Going to War with Our Suppliers?

Meanwhile, imbalances and inefficiencies plague America’s military supply chain. In fact, the president of leading American defense contractor Raytheon chided U.S. policymakers over the summer for risking war with China.

That’s because so much of America’s defense supply chain runs through China. Will Beijing let the U.S. military have open access to wartime supplies in the event of a conflict between the United States and China? Don’t be ridiculous. China has America by the short hair.

China, on the other hand, does not have these problems. Not only has China worked assiduously to proof its society and economy against Western economic sanctions, but it has furthered ties with nearby powers—notably Russia—to ensure that its industrial base will remain untouched by any conflict with the West.

There remain vulnerabilities for China. But in the specific case of China’s massive air fleet and the proximity of their targets to Chinese forces, China could defeat the U.S. alliance in an air war over Taiwan. With America's possible loss of air dominance over Taiwan, China's invasion would have a free hand to do whatever it wanted to against Taiwan's defenders--and Taiwan would be isolated away from its Western allies for the duration of the invasion – unless America sought to significantly escalate against China which is unlikely.
Lol nationalInterest what a pathetic and bogus site always exaggerates things 🤣 🙄 😂
 

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