Launching Cermony of 4th Corvette Held

Dr khan

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Launching Ceremony of state-of-the-art 4th Offshore Patrol Vessel, PNS YAMAMA being built for Pakistan Navy was held at DAMEN Shipyard Galati, Romania. Vice Chief of the Naval Staff, Vice Admiral Ovais Ahmed Bilgrami graced the occasion as Chief Guest. Pakistan already operates 2x Yarmook Class Corvettes PNS Yarmook & PNS Tabuk.

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Why..I doubt Pakistanis have any issues with ships...they are remain at sea !

This will be welcome addition
 
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arslank01

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PNS Tabuk Is gonna visit Qatar in first week of march. Will visit them and try to ask what is causing delays to weaponizing first 2 OPV's
i suspect there may just simply be not a need.

They may just be FFBNW- fitted for, but not with, if the need ever arose, the ships can be up armed very quickly as everything that is needed is there, i guess it just doesnt make sense to do as such when these ships are relegated to relatively mundane duties such as counter piracy where you dont need weapons of those calibre. It is likely a conscious cost saving decision
 

Windjammer

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Pakistan Navy's 4th Offshore Patrol Vessel, PNS YAMAMA 🇵🇰🇵🇰

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Yasser76

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Wow, Batch II, along with Israeli Saar 5 class, seem like the most heavily equipped corvettes in the world
 

Qureshi

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Wow, Batch II, along with Israeli Saar 5 class, seem like the most heavily equipped corvettes in the world

No not batch-II but yes AS3600 design would certainly fall in this league.
 

Joe Shearer

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I would prefer to go by Aamir Hussain Sahib.

What is the difference between a frigate, a corvette and an OPV?
What are their different, even disparate functions?
 

Joe Shearer

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at this point, nothing. The only differentiator i can think of is roles. There are OPVs out there that displace more than our destroyers and carry more weapons too.
Stating that at this point, nothing, is reasonable and accurate. I just wanted to remind ourselves of the essential differences.

A frigate would essentially be a destroyer sized vehicle, without the high-speed capability of a vessel escorting a fleet, that is, a destroyer, Further, a destroyer might be configured to fight off air, surface and submarine threats, although individual classes might be specialised in one or two threat prevention modes more than in others.

A corvette is a mass-produced small vessel, much smaller than destroyers or frigates, built to commercial standards, and designed for mass production. Their original role was as convoy escorts, although more and more navies seem to think of them as coastal defence vessels as well. The essence is the simplicity of design and the possibility of mass producing them.

An offshore patrol vessel is hardly ever called on to threaten other aircraft, or ships, Their original role was as fisheries protection vessels, armed with perhaps a heavy machine gun, and a petty officer with a rough tongue. Again, it is becoming fashionable to design them, but not actually equip them, with weaponry that would greatly enhance their capability in times of war.
 

Quwa

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Stating that at this point, nothing, is reasonable and accurate. I just wanted to remind ourselves of the essential differences.

A frigate would essentially be a destroyer sized vehicle, without the high-speed capability of a vessel escorting a fleet, that is, a destroyer, Further, a destroyer might be configured to fight off air, surface and submarine threats, although individual classes might be specialised in one or two threat prevention modes more than in others.

A corvette is a mass-produced small vessel, much smaller than destroyers or frigates, built to commercial standards, and designed for mass production. Their original role was as convoy escorts, although more and more navies seem to think of them as coastal defence vessels as well. The essence is the simplicity of design and the possibility of mass producing them.

An offshore patrol vessel is hardly ever called on to threaten other aircraft, or ships, Their original role was as fisheries protection vessels, armed with perhaps a heavy machine gun, and a petty officer with a rough tongue. Again, it is becoming fashionable to design them, but not actually equip them, with weaponry that would greatly enhance their capability in times of war.
To some extent, I think you'd also classify ships with proprietary, military-grade shipbuilding standards as frigates and destroyers.

The Damen OPVs are built to commercial specifications, hence their low cost (and quicker production turnaround). However, the I-Class and J-Class likely involve some things in their design that elevate capability (e.g., RCS and IR reduction techniques), but at higher costs or production timelines.

"Corvettes" could fall on either side of the spectrum. For example, the MILGEM (Ada-class and Babur-class) was (IIRC) built to proprietary shipbuilding standards. Likewise, there are Damen and Fincantieri corvette designs that are similar.

OTOH, you have folks like the PN repurposing OPVs into corvettes by basically configuring the heavy weaponry to simpler commercial hulls. IMO, when we look at what the PN required from its OPVs, I don't think ASuW, AAW, and ASW are the OPVs' primary roles. They, like OPVs in other places, are meant for maritime security and support roles (e.g., ELINT, SAR, etc.).

I think the PN is likely keeping the ASuW, AAW, and ASW reconfigurability open-ended in the scenario where it can't afford proprietary-grade ships, which is increasingly likely given the deteriorating state of Pakistan's economy. Hence, when the PN needs to expand ASuW, AAW, and ASW, it can procure lower-cost OPV hulls (which can cost around $50-75 million each).

With this in mind, I think the more interesting question is to see if NRDI designs its own OPV - the likes of ASFAT, Swiftships, or Damen could help.
 

Joe Shearer

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To some extent, I think you'd also classify ships with proprietary, military-grade shipbuilding standards as frigates and destroyers.

The Damen OPVs are built to commercial specifications, hence their low cost (and quicker production turnaround). However, the I-Class and J-Class likely involve some things in their design that elevate capability (e.g., RCS and IR reduction techniques), but at higher costs or production timelines.

"Corvettes" could fall on either side of the spectrum. For example, the MILGEM (Ada-class and Babur-class) was (IIRC) built to proprietary shipbuilding standards. Likewise, there are Damen and Fincantieri corvette designs that are similar.

OTOH, you have folks like the PN repurposing OPVs into corvettes by basically configuring the heavy weaponry to simpler commercial hulls. IMO, when we look at what the PN required from its OPVs, I don't think ASuW, AAW, and ASW are the OPVs' primary roles. They, like OPVs in other places, are meant for maritime security and support roles (e.g., ELINT, SAR, etc.).

I think the PN is likely keeping the ASuW, AAW, and ASW reconfigurability open-ended in the scenario where it can't afford proprietary-grade ships, which is increasingly likely given the deteriorating state of Pakistan's economy. Hence, when the PN needs to expand ASuW, AAW, and ASW, it can procure lower-cost OPV hulls (which can cost around $50-75 million each).

With this in mind, I think the more interesting question is to see if NRDI designs its own OPV - the likes of ASFAT, Swiftships, or Damen could help.
A most satisfying post. Many thanks.
If what you outlined aligns with naval policy in Pakistan, it is eminently sensible.
 

arslank01

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With this in mind, I think the more interesting question is to see if NRDI designs its own OPV - the likes of ASFAT, Swiftships, or Damen could help.
the Navy would massively benefit from visiting the Danish- they've done what the PN is attempting to do via the Iver Huidfeldt class


though, for what its worth, add another 100m in terms of cost as they re used VLS etc off of other ships, but really, this is a great model for the PN to emulate

Particularly, an interesting subject is the StanFlex modules. For the longest of times, ive wondered how great of a capability would it be to have a containerised VLS/wpns system which can be networked with the host ship. Now instead of using GWS Modules in the Jinnah class, or Yarmooks, you have container/mission module spaces which can be rapidly swapped out at ports to then change the mission capabilites of a ship. Imagine a VLS module or a ASW module that could be fitted in a few hours or a day at port, now youve got a fleet capable of doing EVERYTHING as opposed to just one or two things. Its pretty cool, every ship in the RDN is capable of doing AAW for example, even the smallest 200 foot patrol vessels can carry 2 StanFlex modules with anythign from ASW gear up to ASW or AAW. Each StanFlex module can be replaced in 30 minutes. Imagine that.
 
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Quwa

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the Navy would massively benefit from visiting the Danish- they've done what the PN is attempting to do via the Iver Huidfeldt class


though, for what its worth, add another 100m in terms of cost as they re used VLS etc off of other ships, but really, this is a great model for the PN to emulate

Particularly, an interesting subject is the StanFlex modules. For the longest of times, ive wondered how great of a capability would it be to have a containerised VLS/wpns system which can be networked with the host ship. Now instead of using GWS Modules in the Jinnah class, or Yarmooks, you have container/mission module spaces which can be rapidly swapped out at ports to then change the mission capabilites of a ship. Imagine a VLS module or a ASW module that could be fitted in a few hours or a day at port, now youve got a fleet capable of doing EVERYTHING as opposed to just one or two things. Its pretty cool, every ship in the RDN is capable of doing AAW for example, even the smallest 200 foot patrol vessels can carry 2 StanFlex modules with anythign from ASW gear up to ASW or AAW. Each StanFlex module can be replaced in 30 minutes. Imagine that.
The Damen OPVs use containers, which gives the PN an opportunity to practically test the concept. I think that the Yarmouk-class, especially Batch-I, might double in as MCMVs through the modular mission containers.

However, what you say would take things a step further for sure.
 

Malik

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A model of Pakistan Navy's Off-shore Patrol Vessel (OPV) 2600 being constructed by damen was showcased on the company pavilion at DIMDEX2024. The ship's armament includes:
1 x OTO Marlin 40
2 x 6 VLS Cells for CAMM-ER SAMs
2 x 2 P-282 SSMs
1 x Gokdeniz CIWS
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Khanasifm

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There is asw module so there should be torpedo launcher somewhere too ??
standard 20 ft container of 5 different types enhanced ship role covering

e. It also has capacity for five additional mission modules such as
1 ASW (side scan sonar),
2 MCM, UAV/USV, pollution control,
3 hospital facilities,
4 diving support,

5 as well as energy and water-making facilities and more.

So this ship can adopt contain for a specific role in peacetime ans war roles
 

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